Top Ten Books I Read in 2013

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesdays is hosted over at The Broke and the Bookish, with a new Top Ten prompt every week. Check it out!


My Most Excellent Year

1. My Most Excellent Year by Steve Kluger

This. Book. Was. Awesome. Like, literal paperback perfection. Asdlfjkdfs.

2. Out of Sight, Out of Time by Ally Carter (actually the entire Gallagher Girls series, which is made of awesome)

SOMEBODY GET ME MY PAPER BAG. This book was possibly my favorite out of the series because of the intensity and suspense of it all, and the book just sucked me in and spat me back out at the end blubbering and leaking feelings all over the place.

The Mad Scientist's Daughter

3. The Mad Scientist’s Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke

This was just beautiful written and made me cry and uuuuugh.

Weather Witch

4.  Weather Witch by Shannon Delaney

I NEED THE SEQUEL LIKE YESTERDAY PLEASE

Jane Eyre

5. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë

This is now one of my all-time favorite classics. The love story and self-discovery are amazing.

Fuck It

6. F*ck It: The Ultimate Spiritual Way by John C. Parkin

This really made me think and question everything and I loved that the author wasn’t afraid to make the reader uncomfortable.

The Perks of Being A Wallflower

7. The Perks of Being A Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

Beautiful, beautiful book that made me cry and laugh and go through every emotion under the sun.

Shattered Glass

8. Shattered Glass by Dani Alexander

Possibly one of my favorite LGBT romances. The main character is just so human and unique and complex, and the entire story is so fantastic asdfajksdlfj.

Queens Consort

9. Queens Consort: England’s Medieval Queens by Lisa Hilton

This book really got me into medieval history and introduced me to the realities of being a female monarch in medieval times.

Ash

10. Ash by Malinda Lo

Okay, so it wasn’t perfect, but Malinda is a FANTASTIC writer and it was just lovely to read. Also, Kaisa is a badass and I want to marry her. *fangirls*


Those were my picks for 2013. I can’t wait to find more fantastic reads in 2014! Here’s to a great new year filled with good books and friends and adventures and general awesomeness. Happy New Year!

Review of The Perks of Being A Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

**Warning: One or two spoilers**

So I read this novel, The Perks of Being A Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky, on Tuesday in one sitting, which I honestly haven’t done in a long time. I’ve seen the movie twice already, and I’ll be pre-ordering it on Amazon in the next few days (if you’ve been reading my blog, you probably know that I fell harder than diamonds for that movie).

What’s interesting about the book/movie relationship is that Stephen Chbosky wrote the book with a film in mind, and he produced, directed, and wrote the script for the movie version, which is a secret, far-away dream of mine. So I was really excited about reading Perks and seeing if it was as good as/better than/worse than the film, only to discover that any comparison is pointless. They are both incredible in different ways, and trying to pick one over the other is like trying to pick a favorite snowflake.

The novel, short at just over 200 pages, is written in a letter format, and I quickly grew to love the way Charlie, the main character, expresses himself on the page. For such an age, he is remarkably thoughtful and observant, and the way he sees the world and life around him is so refreshing. He made  me laugh one minute and cry the next, and I don’t do either easily when reading.

I was also very happy to see Patrick included and given a significant role in the story; I’m a huge support of LGBT rights, and to know that Perks has been a YA bestseller despite having a leading character who is gay (flamboyantly so) warmed my heart. Patrick is, I must say, one of my favorite characters, both in the movie and the book. Not only is he an incredible friend to those he cares about, but he has issues that many people can relate to and sympathize with. I teared up several times during a few of his scenes, especially the one in the cafeteria.

Sam was everything I hoped she’d be, strong and flawed and beautiful, far from perfect but still someone I can’t help but admire. She’s been through so much and she’s still standing, keeping her heart and mind open and never giving up.

This novel is so powerful because it is fearless. There is suicide, drug and tobacco use, sex, teen drinking, homosexuality,  physical and sexual  abuse, and dangerous amounts of good music, good books, and good advice. I can imagine many parents would find faults in its content, would protest their children reading such a scandalous book, but even though I personally don’t agree with many of the things the characters do, this novel merits not only respect, but appreciation. It is a coming-of-age story, an honest, fresh look of that crazy time between adolescence and adulthood, and it does it with a style that’s both whimsical and somber.

If you are willing to take a chance, try this novel. You may or may not love it, but you will certainly be affected by it.

As for me, it is and will remain among my list of favorites. Thank you, Stephen Chbosky, for giving us your words.